Tuesday, January 12, 2010

I don't give a damn about Harry Reid, and saying "Negro dialect" is just plain weird, but....

reid-obama3.jpg
I'd say that the American "Republicans" attempting to make hay out of this issue are too funny, and not in a good way.

Br. Davey D. has some excellent thoughts on the subject:


"The party of Ronald Reagan who supported South African Apartheid, the party of John McCain who said ‘No to a Martin Luther King holiday are suddenly getting all Jesse Jackson-like and riding hard for all those who have been on the receiving end of racial insults and oppression....

"I was more offended seeing a Professor Tricia Rose, Professor Marc Lamont Hill, BET’s Jeff Johnson and the dozen of other Black faces invited to discuss an old white man using the word ‘Negro’ versus seeing them invited on a regular basis to discuss a variety of other topics that have arguably more impact.

"I would’ve like to have seen some of those Black voices on the Sunday morning talk shows earlier this year dragging Harry Reid’s ass through the coals around the Healthcare debate when single payer and later public option got snatched off the table.

"To me the insult was seeing Black intelligence limited to just this topic, whereas I might see a
dimwit like Ann Coulter invited to weigh in on everything from the War in Afghanistan to what Chris Brown did to Rihanna."

Terrordome guest and sociologist supreme Br. Algernon Austin also threw down:


"Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (D-NV) simply told the truth, in my view. I don't see what he has to apologize for.

"According to the Washington Post, the book Game Change states that when assessing the strengths of then candidate Barack Obama in 2008, Reid said that he 'believed that the country was ready to embrace a black presidential candidate, especially one such as Obama--a 'light-skinned" African American "with no Negro dialect, unless he wanted to have one".'

"There is nothing offensive or even controversial here.

"It seems that some people are upset because they have deluded themselves into thinking that America is a post-racial society. Reid's remarks show an awareness that blackness poses challenges for success with the broad American electorate."

Righteous.

Course, the bwoi is still weird. "Negro"? What is this, 1970? Has dude been watching Good Times or something?

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