MALCOLM X AND HIS YOUNG APPRENTICE, A. PETER BAILEY (MF GALAXY 066)


KNOWING MALCOLM X PERSONALLY, EDITING HIS FINAL NEWSLETTER, HOW MX’S INTERNATIONALISM PRECEDED MLK’S, BOOK ATTACKS ON MALCOLM DISGUISED AS PSYCHOLOGY, AND PRESERVING MX’S LEGACY

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While it’s remarkable that a man who didn’t live past age 39 has achieved immortality, Malcolm X accomplished so much in his brief, dramatic life that the reasons are clear. He was one of the most significant figures of the 20th Century, an African-American whose life, experiences, influences, and effects crossed continents and oceans.

Born in 1925 to a family of activists for Marcus Garvey’s internationalist United Negro Improvement Association, young Malcolm faced numerous obstacles including the murder of his father, likely by Klansmen. Descending to crime and prison, he recreated himself with the aid of the Nation of Islam, one of the many groups that rose following the US government’s destruction of Garvey’s UNIA.

Malcolm employed his astounding intellect, oratorical skill, and organisational brilliance to build the NOI from a few scattered temples of a few hundred people into a nation-wide organisation, and became an electrifying international figure. His success provoked jealousy among other leaders of the NOI, and fear at the highest levels of US intelligence, amply demonstrated in the books Malcolm X: The FBI File by Claybourne Carson and The Judas Factor: The Plot to Kill Malcolm X by Karl Evanzz.

Such jealousy, fear, and intrigue from shadowy heights of US power collided on Feb. 21, 1965, when five NOI assassins murdered the man described by the FBI as a potential “Black messiah.” Malcolm’s final testament, the Autobiography which he co-authored with Alex Haley, is a modern classic.

On this episode of MF GALAXY, we’ll hear from a man who was an apprentice of Malcolm X: A. Peter Bailey. Bailey is a journalist, activist, former editor of Ebony Magazine, a founding member of Malcolm’s secular, united-front Organisation of Afro-American Unity, and editor of its newsletter The Blacklash. With Rodnell P. Collins, a nephew of Malcolm X, Bailey is the author of Seventh Child: A Family Memoir of Malcolm X. He’s also one of the key figures behind the classic book Malcolm X: The Man and His Times.

Bailey spoke with my by telephone from Washington DC on May 16, 2005, just before Malcolm’s 80th birthday. He discussed:
  • Following Malcolm’s path directly by becoming the founding editor of the OAAU’s newsletter, just as years before Malcolm X had founded Muhammad Speaks, the newspaper of the Nation of Islam
  • His personal experience of Malcolm X from working with him in the OAAU
  • Why the OAAU stated repeatedly that it was not a civil rights organisation but a human rights organisation
  • How Malcolm X’s revolutionary internationalism preceded—if not shaped—that of Martin Luther King
  • The many deficiencies in the anti-Malcolm X biography Malcolm: The Life of a Man Who Changed Black America by Bruce Perry, which later formed much of Manning Marable’s book Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, and
  • Bailey’s attempts to keep the US-based Socialist Workers Party and its publishing arm Pathfinder Press from seizing control of Malcolm X’s legacy and historical image
Along the way, Bailey cites Betty Shabazz, Malcolm X’s widow; the Pan-Africanist scholar and activist Dr. John Henrik Clarke, the credited editor of Malcolm X: The Man and His Times; and novelist John Oliver Killens, author of And Then We Heard the Thunder.

We began by discussing the controversy around creating the Malcolm X and Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Education Centre out of the remnants of the Audubon Ballroom where assassins killed Malcolm X in 1965.

And now on MF Galaxy, my conversation with A Peter Bailey.

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